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Subject: Mustique #47 - Deconstructing that preposterous 'p' perversion
(Posted on Nov 15, 2014 at 01:52PM ) Tags:
You’re on vacation on a luxe tropical island, and it’s midmorning on your sister’s wedding day when one of your British cohort offers up a local St. Vincent Hairoun lager to get the day going after breakfast. 


Hey, it’s always night time somewhere, and that’s the way this lot rolled, especially Paine “Pongo” Lytton-Renworth. So you just go with the flow.

[PPLR] “In your case, this should act as prescient parallel post-party palliative and preemptive pre-party potation.”

[BNB] “That’s a plethora of p-p-ps, Pongo. Ten. Well done.”

[PPLR] “I take pains to perform and please.”

[BNB] “But not as many as in, say, uhm, uhhh…Peter Pocklington picked a peck of pickled Popocatapetl peppers with a passel of partisan professional paella peddlers from Pontevedra province peripheral to Portugal.”

[PPLR] “Good heavens. What preposterous p profligacy.”

So just what was Bob's crazy-ass parade of 'p' words all about? The basic building block is that classic tongue twister about Peter Piper, which is included in the Mother Goose collection of rhymes.


Of course Bob, being the eccentric and twisted character he is, had to go jazz that up a bit for adults and take it one step further. So let's look at those elements one at a time. 

First, about that Peter Pocklington cat (we'll abbreviate him as PePo) … if you ain’t a certain age and don’t hail from Canuckistan, you are likely not going to know of our man who used to own the Edmonton Oilers ice hockey team from 1976 to 1998.  


For those not in the sports know, that type of hockey is kinda different from that other hockey some folks play with a curvy stick on grass or artificial turf. Per below, you decide which one is better; not that Bob has any personal preference or bias at all. It's kinda just like how the mainstream media reports the news. 




Now, back to PePo, who was perhaps most (in)famous for signing Wayne Gretzky to the team in 1978 and then later trading his ass to Los Angeles in 1988. Hey, shit happens in pro sports, and that’s the way the ball bounces or puck passes. It’s about da bidni$$, Bobbolin(o/a), and maximizing value on a “depreciating asset.” Get over it.  Local folks in Edmonton at the time of the trade wuz real pissed though.


They sometimes also used to call our PePo guy Peter Puck (and Peter Puke for a bit post trade), but he sure as shit wasn’t the original NHL Peter Puck that Bob remembers as a kid.

Note that in those good old daze, folks playing the game mostly didn’t wear helmets either, and they only became mandatory in 1979. Back in that period, even wearing car seatbelts wasn’t yet legislated either.

Popocatapetl? That’s the active Mexican volcano, most properly spelled with the accent included as Popocatépetl, for those that need to be (anally) accurate.


This video below from 2013 shows a UFO ducking down into the active volcano. Perhaps they were looking for our guy PePo and them pepper pickers cum paella peddlers.


Passel is just some fancypants word for pack, as in a large group of an indeterminate number of people. How big? Who knows … and who cares really. It was all about the 'p' sound stuff anyway at the time. Maybe that and Bob wanting to mess with Pongo's head a bit.

Then we had the bit about the paella, that famous Spanish dish with a long history, and some folks who were selling the stuff in a certain part of Spain. Yo, check out these big-ass paella pans being used. 



 
Pontevedra is both a Spanish city and a province. It’s the province that touches Portugual per this map below.


Note that Pontevedra makes way more sense in the whole tongue twister equation, than, erhm, say other provincial places in the world like Perugia or Pampanga. Hey, it’s entirely plausible that if you wanted special peppers to put in your paella, be they pickled or not, you would do as these folks did, even if you had to go a very long way away to get them, and then bring them back to Spain for the preparation and subsequent peddling in province.

And as for our guy PePo being there at the volcano, maybe he was still in hiding after the whole Gretzy trade debacle and his other follow-on business activities that may not have worked out exactly the way he intended.

Bob always strives to bring you things of consequence in our world, even if he's just some single stumblebum attending weddings around the world, and randomly spewing stuff out on the fly. Bob's take on Peter Piper still isn't as good as the Run-D.M.C. rap take on it and other nursery rhymes from 1986. 




What was behind the saying, "Trust, but verify," that local Justice of the Peace, Stephen Glenroy Adams, employed on the couple during their tropical island paradise wedding ceremony, when there was pushback on his probing line of questioning.

Our main man Ronald Reagan may have been the one to make it famous in English as the Cold War was slowly coming to a close, but it was actually a Russian proverb, as taught to him by Suzanne Massie. She and he both done good over time with that one it seems.

The original version was a favorite of Vladimir Lenin back in his day, so maybe the two are not that far apart after all. cheeky
It sure sounds way better in Russian, and rhymes to boot. If you really want to be on it and impress folks, you can take a quick lesson in Russian from this rap cat, Roos (2RG), on how to pronounce it properly, "doveryai no proveryai," as this gangsta rap ditty  repeats many a time (like on Teletubbies), just so you get it down right.


Yo, your ass don’t need to be knowing no Russian neither to figure out what be going down here. It ain't rocket science, Corky. 

Today, in an instant fulfillment world where just about anybody can trumpet anything, and it can be rebroadcast  ad infinitum in seconds to become "gospel," it’s just a reminder that sometimes just because something is said , and repeated enough, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily true. That goes especially as it concerns politicians and government, be it at the municipal, state/provincial, and national levels.

And, just like our good friend and drinking buddy, Raygun Ronnie, replied back to his newly minted  BFF, Mikhail Gorbachev, back in the day, I use it a lot, because "I like it."


Simple words to increasingly live by in today’s complicated world, where it’s easier than ever to pull the wool over folks’ eyes, because everyone is too busy and hurried to check the details on stuff, and doesn’t want to spend more than two seconds on anything.

It’s a real practical saying, employable in everyday life, be it at work, play, with friends, enemies, and even at home with your spouse / partner too. If you were a naysayer, you may think it means taking things to the extreme of not really trusting anybody, but that’s up to you as to how far it needs to be taken and interpreted. It always depends on the specific situation at hand and the folks you're dealing with, Bobbolin(o/a).

Still an oldie, but a goodie, even if you're just some single stumblebum dude hitting weddings all around the world. 
Доверяй, но проверяй




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Subject: Mustique #47 - Knowing your mules
(Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 02:05PM ) Tags:
When is a mule not the mule you thought it was? When you are in Mustique at your sister’s wedding is when.

These four pictures below should make it pretty straightforward for anyone still perplexed, so as to enable sussing out the differences between the animal, human drug transporter, Kawasaki MULE vehicle, and that fabled cocktail with the Moscow handle slapped on the front end.



Note the simple cocktail (made with vodka, ginger beer and lime, on ice, and ideally in a copper mug as above),, ain’t even from Moscow, but is rather a good ole born-and-bred USA concoction dating to 1941 that became popular a few years later in the 1950s. So much for truth in names and marketing, and kinda like why the news ain’t  always makin’ sense either.

There are some casual  tips for those mulling getting into that line of "transport" work (and not the one competing with the animal) if things are a little slow on the work front around where you are.

Like I mused back on that wedding day, it would be kinda nifty to be in a situation with all four at play simultaneously. You could be enjoying the drink with the other two live ones over witty repartee, taking in tricks of the “transport” trade and optimizing the use of  various cavity spaces over body packing, all the while riding on board that 4-wheeler. It's probably a better idea to be letting someone else do the driving though.

Maybe if you don’t want to be doing all of that in the same-name places in Norway or Nigeria for added effect, you could choose to pull it off in Bishop, CA, the so-called "Mule Capital of the World," when they have that annual Bishop Mule Days festival (website) in the run up to Memorial Day. Turn it into a four-way global mule convention of excellence and party hearty.

I ain't gonna bother to get into the 80s game, M.U.L.E., or the software model / framework.  That is strictly for you real die-hard mule keeners out there. So today, you can say you learned a tad about different mules, without needing to go to the trouble of some average single guy attending weddings in places around the world.



Subject: Mustique #47 - Gettin' all ''rill'' with gin and tonic
(Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 09:09AM ) Tags:
A "proper" gin and tonic, as somebody was once lectured to in gang-bang fashion at his sister’s wedding in Mustique in 2000, is supposedly made with lemon, and NOT lime. And it should never be made with both of those citrus garnishes, despite what one particular punter professed to prefer. However, the real case can be made for all three possibilities, depending where you are.

Hey, I guess if you are British then you must know for sure. The cat in this Telegraph piece really looks like he knows the drill on G+Ts and the proper garnish, from having whacked back a few over the years at home and abroad. Plus, when you're a writer, and your full name is James Gerald Warner of Craigenmaddie, then it must be gospel, even though you may actually be a Scot.

The English cast at that intimate tropical wedding were also going on about Gordon’s Gin (note it is made in Scotland) and Schweppes tonic water both being mandatory for the optimum result. Some contest that Gordon’s isn’t good enough anymore, but there are others who still do swear by it as here. Omelette you decide on that for yourself.

As for juniper and the other botanicals at play generally in gin, I like this piece that mentions turpentine being used back in the day for the masses. Nice one there! Talk about putting a little extra sumpin’ in your jump juice to make it more “hi-test” to squeeze out a little more horsepower per pour.

Maybe the Spanish way is the method to follow per this posting.

Ida know, at the end of the day, I still like lemon AND lime together. Besides, the colors look very cool IMHO.



Add a long stick of black licorice for extra color mojo action in your glass, and presto majesto, you have yourself a bonafide Bob N. Boguslavksi “Jamaican Flag” gin and tonic. 


Note I just made this last bit up, but it sure sounds (and would look) mighty fine. And that ain't no coink-e-dink neither now, so remember you heard it here first. It's completely up to you whether you want to consider chewing that stick down as you go, or just keep reusing it as a garnish, untouched, in your refills.

I so totally agree with one NYC friend (still not married either, but he’s a divorce attorney and knows reality a little too close on the exit side of that game) that there is a reason it's called GIN and tonic, and not the other way around. So you need to make sure you put a “rill” healthy dose of booze in there. If you ever order one in a bar or club in Spain (and some other places outside North America), you will know they be doin’ the deed right as well. And hey, if you are splashin' it out and doin' bottle service and a bit of  V.I. action in some domestic club, cuz that's how you roll and you a player, then you can pour your own measure and keep to the spirit on that, pardon the pun.

Suck back a few of these Spanish (or equivalent) bad boys, and you’ll be getting all kinds of “rill” good insight into how stuff  works for “rill” just like Courtney Stodden in this inspirational gem.


Think “rill" and be “rill” is all I can say. Use “rill” good ingredients too. Bottomline, folks, no matter how you like your G+Ts, just make sure they are “rill” strong. That way, they'll be “rill” good, and the world will quickly seem a better, kinder, and gentler place.


That’s what this single, wedding-guy, traveler-adventurer-cum-poolside bum believes, no matter where he is at in the world.




All the action that day and evening back in February 2000 for Patty and Bruce's wedding revolved between the two villas, Yellow Bird and Flomarine, and Firefly, which was where the ceremony and initial mini-reception were held. 

Yellow Bird was where "somebody" woke up poolside in the mornng at the opening of this chapter after a big night out. 



Flomarine - Gin and tonic anyone?



Firefly - Awesome place to get married, no matter if you want to call it a guest house, a restaurant, or a bar, depending on your point of view. The ceremony took place in the garden by the pool. 



Many other island shots are on this Pinterest board, and here's a great teaser video for Mustique to cap this all off. One is way better grabbing some sun and fun in late February for a troipical wedding than being somewhere like Canuckistan in the dead of winter.