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Subject: Santiago #30 - Some of those character names
(Posted on Jan 14, 2014 at 10:25PM ) Tags:
One of the buried elements inside that wedding (and indeed generally sprinkled throughout the book) is the use of some past famous or notable people names for some of the local / regional characters in the chapter.

If you are from those places, be it Chile, Bolivia or Germany, some of the names may well mean something to you, and were noticed. Four names were slipped in here for the following characters:


- Anita Lizana (1915 – 1994) was a famous Chilean tennis player who reached World #1 ranking in 1937 when she won the U.S. Championships.



- Ramón Vinay (1911 – 1996) was a Chilean operatic tenor.


- Antonio Díaz Villamil (1897 – 1948) was a Bolivian writer, novelist, historian, and folklorist (not to be confused with florist, although one could be both in an exceptional circumstance). The embedded bio link for this cat is in Spanish. 



- Oswalt Kolle (1928 – 2010) was a German sex educator who first became famous in the 60s and 70s for his books and films on sexuality. Hey, even the groom doesn’t get away clean here.


Just because some single guy is hitting far-flung weddings for fun and adventures, doesn’t mean a few obscure references can’t get thrown in there every now and again. Not that any of the above folks looked at all like the characters present at the wedding. And if they bore more than a passing resemblance to each other, maybe it was all just coink-e-dink.

In keeping with the Chlean wedding backdrop, and discussions harking back to a certain politcal periiod in the country during the reception dinner, here's an inspirational number from 1973 that seems just as suitable today in many places around the world outside of that country. Go figure. Some stuff is timeless. The song title translated to Engreesch, means "the people, united, shall never be defeated." It was also on the music playlist for that chapter, no doubt another coink-e-dink.