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What was behind the saying, "Trust, but verify," that local Justice of the Peace, Stephen Glenroy Adams, employed on the couple during their tropical island paradise wedding ceremony, when there was pushback on his probing line of questioning.

Our main man Ronald Reagan may have been the one to make it famous in English as the Cold War was slowly coming to a close, but it was actually a Russian proverb, as taught to him by Suzanne Massie. She and he both done good over time with that one it seems.

The original version was a favorite of Vladimir Lenin back in his day, so maybe the two are not that far apart after all. cheeky
It sure sounds way better in Russian, and rhymes to boot. If you really want to be on it and impress folks, you can take a quick lesson in Russian from this rap cat, Roos (2RG), on how to pronounce it properly, "doveryai no proveryai," as this gangsta rap ditty  repeats many a time (like on Teletubbies), just so you get it down right.


Yo, your ass don’t need to be knowing no Russian neither to figure out what be going down here. It ain't rocket science, Corky. 

Today, in an instant fulfillment world where just about anybody can trumpet anything, and it can be rebroadcast  ad infinitum in seconds to become "gospel," it’s just a reminder that sometimes just because something is said , and repeated enough, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily true. That goes especially as it concerns politicians and government, be it at the municipal, state/provincial, and national levels.

And, just like our good friend and drinking buddy, Raygun Ronnie, replied back to his newly minted  BFF, Mikhail Gorbachev, back in the day, I use it a lot, because "I like it."


Simple words to increasingly live by in today’s complicated world, where it’s easier than ever to pull the wool over folks’ eyes, because everyone is too busy and hurried to check the details on stuff, and doesn’t want to spend more than two seconds on anything.

It’s a real practical saying, employable in everyday life, be it at work, play, with friends, enemies, and even at home with your spouse / partner too. If you were a naysayer, you may think it means taking things to the extreme of not really trusting anybody, but that’s up to you as to how far it needs to be taken and interpreted. It always depends on the specific situation at hand and the folks you're dealing with, Bobbolin(o/a).

Still an oldie, but a goodie, even if you're just some single stumblebum dude hitting weddings all around the world. 
Доверяй, но проверяй




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