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Some names used in this chapter, and indeed generally sprinkled throughout the book, can have special meaning or significance, particularly if one is from a specific country, culture or language tied to the origin of the name.

One of the more obvious character names here is Wade Roe, a reverse  twist on Roe v. Wade, one of the US Supreme Court’s landmark rulings, dating back to the early 70s.

Then you had Wade's longstanding girlfriend, Klytaimnestra Patsatsoglou, which she shortened to Klyta Patsa, and again as needed to just everyday Cleopatra to make it easier for most to pronounce. We'll deal with both names separately, 

Klytaimnestra (a variation on the more common Clytemnestra spelling) [Κλυταιμνήστρα], is a Greek name composed of the elements klytos, "famous, praiseworthy," and mnestria for "wooing," hence "famous for her suitors." In mythology, this is the name of the wife of Agamemnon.

Note that our mythological gal murdered her husband, per the beef she had with him as covered in Homer’s Odyssey. Yet another another classical literature note of caution for the fellows out there to not get on the bad side of da Boss in a big way, once you are married and joined at the hip. 

Now, to deal with her surname, Patsatsoglou, (also spelled Patsatzoglou). The fame connection comes from Christos Patsatzogloua past footballer (or soccer player) for Olympiacos F.C. Generally, Patsa is a Greek "delicacy" soup made of cow (or pork or lamb)  feet and stomach. Patsatsoglou means the son of the patsa maker. Stuff looks pretty enticing, doesn’t it?


You can read more about patsa here in this fine piece so you can work up an appetite.

Then there was the bride’s very long name... 

Ku’ene Penelope Makamae Pe Ts'ai Fook Chang Kaneaiakala

Whoa, whaddup with that moniker mayhem?! Four things got thrown into her naming mix, combining Hawaiian, Chinese, Greek and English elements. 

Ku’ene – "Queen / Queenie" in English.

Penelope - "White shoulder" in English/Gaelic, but also with Greek origins and ties, translating to "Bobbin" and another reference to Homer's Odyssey, as she was the faithful wife of Odysseus.

Makamae – "Precious" or "cherished"

Pe Ts’ai – another name for Chinese cabbage or bok choi / choy. Someone was having a little fun in the name creation department.

The rest of her name string elements threw in some more Chinese and Hawaiian for good measure to plump it out. 


The “precious” part of her name reminds me of this scene with Gollum (originally called Sméagol) from The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002). I can just imagine Eala saying something like this to Ku'ene, even if the movie came after the 2001 wedding.



The rest of the bride's family's first names were all a little more straightforward, but ran on a regal / royal line, save for Mama Bear. 

Eala (her father) - meaning/translating to "Earl" from Hawaiian

Kuke (brother #1) - "Duke"

Palonu (brother #2) - "Baron"

Kaula (mother) – "Prophet", a variant of Kaulana (Famous)

And now, to deal with the big Daddy of them all in that chapter, that kool elder shaman kat Bob met toward the end of the evening.

"Keli’i Ku’uaki Kahoohanohano,he introduced himself, "from Kealakekua. That’s on the Kona coast, between Kahaluu-Keauhou and Kahauloa— on the big island."

Keli'i [pronounced as key lee ee] - The Chief

Ku'uaki [koo' oo (w)ah' kee] – Guardian

Kahoohanohano (also possibly Kaho’ohanohano) is a family name seen in Hawaii. 

Note "Kona Coast" as a title has double-down pop culture immortalization from the 1968 film and 1977 Beach Boys song. So, like, it must no doubt be a happening kind of spot.


Hey, when you be making up stuff as some single dude traveling the world for weddings, you kinda sorta need to keep it based in reality, so it’s a little more plausible and palatable. 

There was a trio of Hawaiian words used in the chapter to help all tie this stuff together: kupuna ("elder" most simply), kanoa ("commoner" generally, but also, "free one" if a first name), and kahuna (Hawaiian shaman,or a preeminent person / thing in the mainstream)

This golden oldie (written in 1933), "My Little Grass Shack in Kealakekua, Hawaii", plays into some of the K-name and -location kookiness in the book with its tropical setting. This caps off today's Hawaiian lesson, with dollops of Greek and Chinese thrown into the soup for added global flavor.